eComputerBay

Computer Bay
Login | Register Build Your PC
Build UR PC  
New Used Refurbished
 USD ($)    Skype Connection    Skype Connection
Buy, Sell & Promote Computers World Over

Product Search Bar

  Computer Dictionary : URL (Uniform Resource Locator)
 

Welcome to the eComputer Bay's Computer Dictionary - the free online dictionary of computer and technology terms. The goal of the Computer Dictionary is to not just define computer terms, but explain them as well.

Definitions of computer terms are helpful, but explanations with examples are even better. eComputer Bay contains hundreds of computer and technology terms, all with detailed explanations.

Use the Search Bar Below To Get Computer Definations And To Check out All the Terms Simply leave the Computer Term Blank...-



Computer Term

1. URL (Uniform Resource Locator)

Stands for "Uniform Resource Locator." A URL is the address of a specific Web site or file on the Internet. It cannot have spaces or certain other characters and uses forward slashes to denote different directories. Some examples of URLs are http://www.cnet.com/, http://web.mit.edu/, and ftp://info.apple.com/. As you can see, not all URLs begin with "http". The first part of a URL indicates what kind of resource it is addressing. Here is a list of the different resource prefixes:

  • http - a hypertext directory or document (such as a Web page)
  • ftp - a directory of files or an actual file available to download
  • gopher - a gopher document or menu
  • telnet - a Unix-based computer system that you can log into
  • news - a newsgroup
  • WAIS - a database or document on a Wide Area Information Search database
  • file - a file located on your hard drive or some other local drive
The second part of a URL (after the "://") contains the address of the computer being located as well as the path to the file. For example, in "http://www.cnet.com/Content/Reports/index.html," "www.cnet.com" is the address or domain name of the host computer and "/Content/Reports/index.html" is the path to the file. When a address ends with a slash and not something like ".html" or ".php," the Web server typically defaults to a file in the current directory named "index.html," "index.htm," or "index.php." So, if you type in "http://www.apple.com/" and "http://www.apple.com/index.html," you should get the same page. Go ahead and try it if you have nothing better to do.



 
 



Free Online Computer Dictionary

Copyright © eComputerBay.com All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole
or in part in any form or medium without written permission is prohibited.
Usage of this web site is subject to terms and conditions.
eComputerBay on
© eComputerBay - (2007-2018)